Results of meeting

The childrens services committee held their meeting yesterday (22 January) where there was 6 hours of debate over these proposals.

Following the debate several amendments were proposed by opposition parties, but these were rejected during a vote.  Following this, the committee was asked to vote on the proposals.

The vote was accepted by by 9 votes to 4, meaning that the proposals to keep 15 centres open as operational bases.

The drivers for change were given as follows:

  1. Securing better outcomes for children and their families
  2. Ambition to build an early childhood system in Norfolk
  3. Alignment with the Healthy Child Programme and the Library Service
  4. Current operating model and use of budget
  5. Transformation and financial context

The budget breakdown is as follows:

Current budget use % of budget Indicative budget use for delivering the new early childhood and family service % of budget
Front line delivery costs £4,027,289 39% £3,250,000 62%
Management and admin costs (including management fees) £4,243,539 41% £1,150,000 22%
Building and infrastructure costs (inc. cleaning & caretaking, hire of outreach venues) £1,078,896 11% £550,000 10.5%
Hardship fund (in future family support fund) £471,773 5% £250,000 5%
Contingency/set aside for redundancy reserves £410,680 4% £32,177 0.5%
total £10,232,177 100% £5,232,177 100%

 

By making these changes, the council says the new service will operate in the following way:

  1. Provide targeted support for families with children aged 0-5
  2. Offer help so that all families can connect with local support and universal early childhood activities
  3. Operate from 15 early childhood and family bases & use a large range of local delivery venues
  4. Contribute to joint working and maintaining partnerships to secure a district early childhood offer.

 


QUESTIONS TO THE COMMITTEE

Various public questions were submitted into the committee.

Question 1 from Alice Mouncer

How can you justify closing North City Childrens centre when 93% of eligible local residents are registered, and of course, 09% regularly attend the centre? Any other business, organisation or service would see figures would that as a wild success, not a reason for closure! Please tell us why North City has been earmarked for closure when it is such a roaring success.

Reply from committee

Registration and attendance of the current service was not a consideration in selection or choice of proposed bases within the new model.

The rationale for the original proposed bases is detailed in the consultation document and the updated rationale as a result of the consultation process is detailed within the committee report.

There was no one deciding factor that determined which buildings we have recommend as bases. We have taken a number of factors into consideration to provide an appropriate network of buildings across the county and within each district area, that would be enable us to prioritise the delivery of direct support work with families who need extra help whilst maintaining a level of universal provision. This will include the delivery of services within bases, especially in areas of high need, but with greater emphasis on taking services out to where families live, alongside supporting families at home.

Question 2 from Alice Mouncer

Has any more research been done on the feasibility of using alternative venues for sessions such as Pathway to Parenting and bounce and babble? The initial consultation document appeared to assume that there would be plenty of church room, village halls and other community spaces readily available for courses and sessions, without considering accessibility, suitable and consistend times and date of availability, cost, location, parking, changing facilities etc. Who will be dealing with all the admin around room hire?

Reply from committee

NCC has reviewed the location of alternative delivery venues throughout this service redesign. The new model will increase the choice and number of venues that families can access, as services will be offered across districts and no longer restricted to postcode reach areas. This includes the range of community venues that are used currently, or have been previously, to run children’s centre services for children and families, and which will be potentially used, depending on families’ needs, as part of the new service offer to take services out to families. Given their previous use by children’s centres with families, we are confident that these are suitable venues.

Beyond this, our 47 libraries are well placed to deliver universal services such as “bounce and rhyme sessions” and our Adult Education family learning classes are run from a variety of locations across the county, including the libraries, community centres and Wensum Lodge. These locations can be used, in response to local needs as they are indentified and relfect our ambition for joining up opportunities and services as part of a new whole system approach. In addition, the library service recently undertook a trial of “pop up venues” in some rural locations and report back to January 2019 Communities Committee.

We will expect the new Early Childhood and Family Service provider to take responsibility for the administration of room hire as part of delivering a responsive and flexible operational service. We also promote joined up opportunities for use of outreach venues through our local partnership arrangements.

Question 3 from Danielle Ross

I live in Brundall and have already seen drop in sessions for baby weighs be cancelled at my 2 local doctors surgeries due to HV cuts. I now go to Acle Children’s Centre or Sprowston to have my 3 month old baby weight. Both of these are on the proposed list of closures. So my question is; why are so many centres within the areas being closed? And have you considered how this would effect GP/hospital care when a comparison of growth is required for treatement, yet it will be more difficult and inconvenient for parents to get their babies weighed regularly?

Reply from committee

Acle is one of the proposed locations for a base in the Broadland district. We have proposed a service model that is focused on taking services out to families, rather than relying on delivering services within a number of designated buildings. As detailed in the report to CS Committee, we have proposed operating via a network of 15 bases.

In relation to access to baby weighing services, as well as clinic sessions we now offer self-weigh in all Norfolk libraries, including Brundall and Blofield – and will expand this to include availability at pop up libraries if parents would welcome this. Where a baby is required to be weighed at home for any specific reason that means self-weigh or clinic is not approporate, the HCP will of course continue to do so.

Those libraries that have Open Library technology will also have extended opening hours meaning that, after registering at the library, people can access 7 days a week: from 8am to 7pm on week days, 9am – 4pm Saturdays and 10am – 4pm Sundays. Library staff will be able to signpost parents who have any concern to the Just One Norfolk phone number and other services, including the new Early Childhood and Family Service, where they can speak to a professional for advice or be referred to the support they need.

Question 4 from Jon Watson

Following the public consultation that was held by Norfolk County Council in regards to the first set of proposals released by this committee, the response that was experienced was very high for a public consultation.

The report that was released on 14th January 2019 shows that 68% of residents who responded are against the plans to close children’s centres, along with 54% of organisations. As this data shows the majority of respondents are against the proposals, why is this council still pushing ahead with any closures, which shows a clear disregard for public opinion and ignores the consultation findings, and also ignores it’s own data.

Reply from committee

Consultations are not referdums or popular votes. The are information-gathering exercises that help to test proposals with those directly affected, experts and with residents more generally. In particular, they help us understand the impact our proposals on those affected to inform our Equality and Rural Assessment and any mitigating actions we might need to take if our proposals went ahead.

As such our consultation findings are just one of the elements that committees take into consideration when making a decision. Members also need to take into account the Equality and Rural Assessment, the evidence of need and what is proven to work effectively and well, and the financial and legal constraints at the time.

In the case of this consultation, we are very grateful fore the numbers of induviduals as well organisations responding and the detailed comments that they have provided. THe recommendations tot eh Children Service Committee have very much been informed by consultation responses. The committee will have before them the consultation report, the Equality and Rural Assessment as well as listen to COmmittee Member views and questions posed by public in reaching their decision on Tuesday.

Question 5 from Richard Steer

Wasn’t the consultation fundamentally flawed becuase no analysis was made of the true costs and benefit of Children’s Centres*, in particular the savings to mental health services from the Centres’ role in support mothers with Post Natal Depression?

* This ommission is confirmed in NCC’s response to my Freedom of Information Request (ENQ-293665) which refers only to and Equality Impact Assessment which is not an aconomic assessment. The response also confirms that “We have not specifically spoken to Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust about Post Natal Depression.” NCC officers have used an economic argument to say the centres are not affordable, but they have failed to take account of the potentially huge costs savings to mental health services that result from the support provided by Children’s Centres.

Reply from committee

The purpose of the consultation was to seek feeback on a proposed new service model that is focused on taking targeted services out fo buildings and closer to where families live, with a stronger focus on impact and outcomes. We do recognise the value of many of the services currently provided, including where these support families in terms of their emotional wellbeing and mental health.

With the proposed emphasis on outreach and supporting families in a more targeted way, including in their home, the new service will offer greater opportunities to make contact with mothers suffering post-natal depression (many of whom struggle to leave the house) and to better support them to access support from relevant mental health professionals. As part of developing more of a ‘whole system’ approach we expect the new service to work closely with these and other professionals as part of a building a team around the family.

We recognise the impact that postnatal depression has on mothers, babies and the wider family and close working with mental health colleagues will be essential for the new Early Childhood and Family Service. We also expect the new Early Childhood and Family Service to work alongside the Healthy Child Programme which provides ante and postnatal support for all parents, early identification and assessment of post-natal depression, and early intervention is a key role of health visitors who are trained and highly skilled to deliver this role. In addition, the Healthy Child Programme has invested in an enhanced Emotional Healthy Pathway. Led by clinical psychologists and specialist practitioners, the service provides training and consultation for their own practitioners, and the wider early years workfroce, as well direct early intervention to suppor the parent child relationship.

As a council we are working closely with the health system as part of redesigning mental health services for children and adolescents. Increasing support for parental mental health is part of the Fiver Year Forward View for Mental Health. The specialist perinatal mental health services have been increasing over that past 2 years specifically around community and outreach models across Norfolk and Waveney.

Question 6 from Mr C Collis

The outcome of the recent Ofsted inspection of North Walsham High School was reported by the Eastern Daily Press along with comments from parents. What action will be taken to address their considerable concerns and will the local authority terminate any professional arrangement they have with the Chair of Governors at North Walsham High?

Reply from committee

We are continuing to work with the school and the governing body. The judgement for the school from Oftsed confirms our view that the school has the capacity to improve.

The local authority has no “professional arrangement” with the Chair of Governors.

Question 7 from Lex Thompson

Research into early years care has demonstrated that for every £1 on quality early care and education, £13 is saved in future costs for children reached. In the wake of the Conservative Councillors looking to save £3 with the closure of centres throughout the county, I would like to know please: where do you envisage you will find the £39m required later on to cover the needs of this children as they grow?

Reply from committee

We agree that investment in early childcare and education provides the best indicators for future outcomes. In Norfolk we have good early years provision and this model will enhance that through bringing the system together for families who need it most. This is why the council is continuing to spend £65m a year on services to support families with children aged 0-5. It is essential that our services are focused on impact and outcomes, so that we can be clear that they are making a positive difference for children and their families. We have developed a new framework to focus planning and delivery of services, for the proposed new Early Childhood and Family Service, and the wider system. We have had strong endorsement of this approach from the Early Intervention Foundation as hilighted in the report to CS Committee.

 


MEMBERS QUESTIONS

Questions were also submitted by Local members.

Question from cllr Alexandra Kemp

Can the Committee assure residents that Children’s Services always seriously considers the possibility of Kinship Care, before placing a child in foster care or adoption, and that there is no conscious or subconscious discrimination in Norfolk, against support children in poorer neighbourhoods to stay within the extended family? Research shows that Looked-After children have been more likely to become homeless adults, becuase social workers took a restrictive approach to promoting a child’s contact with the wider family.

Reply from committee

The LA, is committed to supporting children to remain in the care of their parnets, where it is safe to do so. When this is not possible family members are always explored in the first instance with a view that this could become a Kinship care arrangement. It is only when there are no suitable Kinship arrangements will the LA, consider alternate options of foster care of adoption. Arrangements such as children who are placed for adoption are always overseen by the Court who scrutinise the Local Authorities care plan. Children who placed in Kinship Care will receive financial, practical support and training as a Kinship foster carer. The Local Authority are committed to support children to be supported in their own family of origin where this is safe to do so. Equally, the LA has a duty to promote safe and good quality contact between children, young people and their birth family including their wider family where is it considered in the child or young persons best interests. Such arrangements form the basis of hildren and young people’s care plans that have scrutiny and oversight of Independent Reviewing Officers, and through our commitment to and promotion of a family networking approach, that they stay in touch into adulthood with those important to them and who can provide a range of ongoing practical and emotional support.

Question from cllr Keith Kiddie

On behalf of the community of Diss I welcome the proposals for the new Early Childhood and Family Service and the location of the bases which will deliver this service across South Norfolk. I fully support the concept of outreach from the bases to get more consistent support to those who need it the most. Could you please reassure the constituents of South Norfolk, who will not be in sight of one of the proposed new bases that the intention is to provide them and particularly, those in the most need, with a better service than the current model.

Reply from committee

The proposed new Early Childhood and Family Service will have a clear focus on taking services out to families, rather than expecting them to attend one of the bases. We recognise that under the current model, for many families, especially in more rural communities, getting to a designated children’s centre is challenging and limits their access to support. This shwy we are proposing greater use of suitable and safe delivery venues in communities that are close to where families live. May families already access these venues in their community for other community activities, and this familiarity will help break down the barriers that some families can experience in accessing the support they need.

Whilst continuing to provide regular opportunities for all families to access support, through drop-ins, and the enhanced online offer, the new service will be more targeted at families who need extra help, through offering one to one support, targeted groups and where it is appropriate working with families in their home.

Closer working with partner agencies, such as the Healthy Child Programme and our Library and Adult Learning services, will also add to the range of universal activities and support that families are able to access across the district. For example, the latter offer responsive courses around Family Learning, as well as second chance learning to build functional skills around English and Maths.

Question from cllr Andrew Jamieson

I have read and fully support the latest proposals to change the way our Early Childhood and Parental Services are delivered.

This evidence based move to a more targeted approach to helping families not only means that more money will be spent on provision of services rather than administration but will also mean an enormous improvement in access to and quality of children’s services in rural Divisions such as mine

Hunstanton Town Council has been developing a business plan to acquire NCC’s old Sure Start building to use a multi-service Community hub.

Can you give us details of any support available to the Town Council in order to make the building fit for purpose in the future? Furthermore, can you advise what level of support will be available to the Town Council in order to make the building fit for purpose in the future? Furthermore, can you advise what level of support will be available to the Town Council and to the community groups wishing to access regular outreach support and drop-in services from the Community Hub and detail what help there will be in establishing and maintaining these universal childhood activities.

Reply from committee

The council has agreed a £500,000 capital fund to support community groups and organisations take on the running of buildings currently designated as a children’s centre, but not required as one of the proposed 15 bases for new Early Childhood and Family Service. This funding is in addition to the revenue funding of £5.2m previously agreed by Full Council for the new service.

We are keen to see as many of these sites taken on and continue to provide services for families with children aged 0-5. With local interest expressed in the building in Hunstanton we are confident that the initial interest for future use of the site can be pursued following decision making by CS Committee in January.

We will expect the new Early Childhood and Family Service to identify local accessible and suitable delivery locations to provide a range of services to support families in Hunstanton and the surrounding areas of West Norfolk, alongside working with families in their own home, where this is appropriate. We expect this to include use of the building currently designated as a children’s centre in the town, integrating support provided by the new service with any future services being delivered onsite, e.g. childcare or the range of services operating out of a community hub.

The new Service will also have a role to support and work with community led groups and activiires, as we recognise that these universal groups and activities are a key part of the wider early childhood offer for families in any community. In addition to staff from the Service visiting and working with these groups to help families access the support they need, we will aso be establishing a £250,000 fund to support community development across all districts.

Working closely with Kin’s Lynn and West Norfolk Council, Town and Parish Councils and voluntary sector organisations, we will build on existing local community development to ensure that there are the needed ‘networks of support’ for local families with young children.

Question from cllr Mike Smith-Clare

Can members be assured that all archived social work case files are stored according to regulatory requirements and that any anomalies, including missing or empty files have been appropriately identified and reported?

With the need for a food bank in North Denes Primary School – is it possible that many children will experience increased hunger during school holidays when free meals and food distributions aren’t available and as corporate parents how can we monitor and intervene with there is a need?

Reply from committee

  1. Our records management policy details the responsibility we have to handle our information and records in accordance with General Data Protection Regulations. All staff are aware of their responsibilities to adhere to our information management policies and procedures. These include procedures to ensure we keep the information we hold on children and families safe and a procedure for missing files.
    A similiar question was asked in 2018 regarding missing files, here is the response provided at the time.  This information is unchanged, and we have not had any further cases of missing files that have been reported to the Information Commissioner. ‘There has been a very small number of cases where a person has requested their files, but we could not provide all of the information. The number is so small that we were unable to give the number or details without risking identifying the people concerned. These cases have been reported and the Information Commissioner decided to take no further action. We are sorry to the people concered, as the management of their records fell short of the standard we would expect.
  2. The North Denes food bank was created by the school to help a small number of families who are coming into school every day and is linked to supporting them with wider skills to prepare meals. We know there are other food banks in Great Yarmouth which they could access. The council is corporate parents to children in local auhority care, and not all children. Whilst we would not wish for any child to be hungry parents are responsible for ensuring that have food and that they access the available support.

Question from cllr C Jones

Following the release of the Council;s plans for Children’s Centres, which refer to targeting services on specific groups and to a referral process, a number of constituents have asked me what the inclusion criteria for the new service will be, and who is able to make referrals. Can the chairman please provide details which I can pass onto concerned parents?

Reply from committee

The new Early Childhood and Family Service is open to all families with children aged 0-5 and will offer appropriate and proportionate support. The offer of support will match need, ranging from providing information, advice and guidance (including online), drop-ins open to families, and targeted evidence-based interventions, whether through one to one support or in small groups/ Targeted one to one support and groups for families who meet the criteria for Tier 2 support (as described in the report) will be accessed via a referall which can be made from a professional or the family themselves, this is the current process and will not change in the new model.

The Children’s Service system as a whole offers a wide range of open access activiries and groups run in local communities and Early Years childcare settings run by a range of partners, including the Healthy Child Programme and libraries. These universal services currently enjoy high engagement with a broad range of families and are a key element to ensuring children can access a range of support geared towards their healthy development and enable families to move activities and will be expanded to include the digital offer.

The Early Childhood and Family Service will work with existing providers to ensure that there is an integrated referrak pathway for families who need more targetted individualised support – with the right person, providing the right intervention at the right time.

Question from Mrs B Jones

East City children’s centre in my division is disappointingly earmarked for closure. In the criteria you say you have considered the quality of the environment. How is the decision to close my purpose built, child centred building compatible with this criteria, when non-purpose build / child focussed environments are being retained?

Reply from committee

The rationale for the orignal proposed bases are set out within the consultation document and updated rationale in the CS Committee report. There was no one deciding factor that determined which buildings we have recommended as bases. We have taken a number of factors into consideration to provide an appropriate network of buildings across the county and within each district area, that would best enable us to prioritise the delivery of direct support work with families who need extra help whilst maintaining a level of universal provision. This will include the delivery of services within bases, especially in areas of high need, but with greater emphasis on taking services out to where families live, alongside supporting families at home.

Whilst the current buildings designated as a children’s centre vary considerably, given that a number of the venues to offer high quality spaces for early childhood services, we will strive to support continued future use by services focused on families with children agred 0-5 yrs.

Question from Ms C Rumsby

Considering the safeguarding measures that are put into any space which is for children, be it Children Centre or Nursery, what safeguarding will be put in place in a community centre or Library?  Given anyone can walk into a community centre and there is now remote access to most Libraries, what are you going to do? And for those communities that have no community centre and Library and homes have safeguarding issues, what are you going to do? Given County is just out of special measures, you are really taking a risk with this new model and risking not only child but families as a whole.

Reply from committee

Children’s Centres have historically used a range of community venues, including libraries, as a safe and suitable space to work with children and families. Four of the sites currently designated as a children’s centre are libraries. Libraries are widely considered to be safe spaces and there have been no issues in delivering universal services, such as Bounce and Rhyme, Mini-movers etc., to the children and families to date. Similarly, the introduction of the Open Library offer has demonstrated that people use the libraries in a considerate and respectful way. All library staff undertake safeguarding training, and this includes being able to pick up and act upon any concerns in a timely and appropriate manner.

The new Early Childhood and Family service provider will be expected to assess that any venues being used are appropriate to the needs of the families, and to ensure that approporate steps are taken to keep service users safe.

Question from Mr T Jermy

Just two Children’s Centres will be kept operational in the Breckland District. Given the lack of public transport in the District, with no traim access to Swaffham, and poor bus routes elsewhere, does the Committee anticipate any usage of the two remaining Centres from families currently accessing Centres in areas suc as Dereham, Watton and Attleborough.

Reply from committee

The rationale for the original proposed bases is detailed in the consultation document and the update rationale as a result of the consultation process is detailed within the committee report.

There was no one deciding factor that determined which buildings we have recommended as bases. We have taken a number of factors into consideration to provide an appropriate network of buildings across the coounty and within each district area, that would be enable us to prioritise the delivery of direct support work with families who need extra help whilst maintaining a level of unversal provision. This will include the delivery of services within bases, especially in areas of high need, but with grater emphasis on taking services out to where families live, alongside support families at home.

The Enterprise Centre, containing space designated as Attleborough children’s centre, will become a new a multi-function service hub later in the year and a range of services will be delivered rom this site. Families will be able to access services in a flexible way across Breckland either at bases if they live nearby, or in venues that are more accessible in the local community, including libraries, or where it is appropriate, at home.

Question from Mrs C Walker

May I ask the chair why you are not listening to our constituents who have overwhelmingly raised concerns during the consultation process by requesting that this council keep open our children’s centres. The public are incensed by the complete lack of empathy shown by the Conservative run council and are keen to get you to rethink this outrageous decision overturned and try listening to the voice of those who elected us.

Reply from committee

Consultations are not referendums or popular votes. They are information-gathering exercises that help to test proposals with those directly affected, experts and with residents more generally. In particular, they help us understand the impact our proposals on those affected to inform our Equality and Rural Assessment and any mitigating actions we might need to take if our proposals went ahead.

As such our consultation findings are just one of the elements that committees take into consideration when making a decision. Members also need to take into account the Equality and Rural Assessment, the evidence of need and what is proven to work effectively and well, and the financial and legal positions and constraints at the time.

In the case of this consultation, we are very grateful for the numbers or people responding and the detailed comments that they have provided. The recommendations to the Childen Service Committee have very much been informed by the consultation responses. The Committee will have before them the consultation report, the Equality and Rural Assessment as well as listen to Committee members views and questions posed by public in reaching their decision on Tuesday.

Question from cllr J Brociek-Coulton

How is your decision to close North City Children’s centre consistent with the criteria that you have said yo used? There is not a library in our reach area, yet some centres being retained have a library in theirs? Only 6 groups listed as alternatives are in North City, and the list of providers is not accurate as it includes duplication. How many alternatives are there in my division that are free to use, and how many have current vacancies?

Reply from committee

The rationale for the original proposed bases is detailed in the consultation document and the updated rationale as a result of the consultation process is detailed within the committee report.

There as no one deciding factor that determined which buildings we have recommended as bases. We have taken a number of factors into consideration to provide an appropriate network of buildings across the county and within each district area, that would best enable us to prioritise the delivery of direct support work with families who need extra help whilst maintaining a level of universal provision. This will include the delivery of services within bases, especially in areas of high need, but with greater emphasis on taking services out to where families live, alongside supporting families at home.

The opportunity to move to a more flexible delivery model that does not restrict families’ access to service based on their postcode and centre reach areas, means there will be greater opportunities for the workforce to offer services across the city, widening where families can access the support they need.

Ncc has reviewed the location of alternative deliver venues as part of this service redesign. This includes the range of community venues that are used currently, or have been previously used, depending on families’ needs, as part of the new service offer to take services out to families. Given their use by children’s centres with families, we are confident that these are suitable venues and spaces that are accessible, safe and meet the needs of local families.

The 6 community led groups listed in the North City area were identified as current and complementary community groups that local families already access.

Question from cllr Emma Corlett

How was the children’s centre in my division, City and Eason, assessed for suitability and capacity to accommodate additional staff in the future children’s centre model? I attach a photograph of the current car park situation on a daily basis, as requested by Cllr Dark. Please also confirm who owns the leasehold for this group level car park, adjoining the Vauxhall Centre.

Reply from committee

The rationale for the original proposed bases is detailed in the consultation document and the update rationale as a result of the consultation process is detailed within the committee report.

There was no one deciding factor that determined which buildings we have recommended as bases. We have taken a number of factors into consideration to provide an appropriate network of buildings across the county and within each district area, that would best enable us to prioritise the delivery of direct support work with families who need extra help whilst maintaining a level of universal provision. This will include the delivery of services within bases, especially in areas of high need, but with greater emphasis on taking services out to where families live, alongside supporting families at home.

With the emphasis on delivering an outreach model of service, we expect the new provider to make use of the network of 3 bases within the city in a flexible way that enables staff to be out delivering services and working directly with families across the city. This would mean staff being able to work out of any of the bases.

The leasehold for the ground level car park outside the Vauxhall Centre is leased to Independence Matters.

Question from cllr John Ward

Could the Chairman please confirm that the proposals for the new Early Childhood and Family service are based on professional and evidenced advice and could he comment on the key recommendations of the All Party Parliamentary Group looking into the future of Children’s Centres.

Reply from committee

The proposed new Early Childhood and Family Service have been developed by officers taking proper account of national policy, evidence about the effectiveness of children’s centres and research about ‘what works’. This has been an extensive peice of work, reflected in the quality and depth of the report being presented to CS Committee. As you are aware, it is part of our Council’s commitment to ensure that future service design and delivery is evidenced based. I am pleased to nore the endorsement by the Early Intervention Foundation for Norfolk’s work in developing a clear logic model focused on impact and outcomes – the different being made for families, rather than simply capturing registration and engagement data.

The All Party Parliamentary Group’s report is a significant peice of evidence, not least given that it has been endorsed by all political parties nationally. The proposed new Early Childhood and Family Service, along with the emphasis on building a system approach to meeting the needs of families in Norfolk is entirely consistent with the report’s 12 recommendations which focus on health and development, employment support and childcare, relationship support and supporting families with complex needs. The report advocates delivering services through wider community venues from pre-birth and throughout life, engaging with voluntary, self-help and peer support organisations, providing online support systems and creating better links with local employers and Jobcentre Plus.

 

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